Gone from the school, not from the Heart

Gone+from+the+school%2C+not+from+the+Heart

The time-honored tradition of “Gone from the school, not from the Heart” continues to commemorate the legacy of the previous year’s graduating class of editors. As practice dictates, the first to be featured are last year’s King Street Chronicle management team.
Katie Nail
University of Virginia Class of 2020
Editor-in-Chief of the King Street Chronicle
How would you describe your initial reaction to living at the University of Virginia (UVA).
UVA is so amazing. I initially was pretty scared coming into a school with over 16,000 undergraduate students, but there is a great sense of community on the Grounds that makes it feel like a home away from home. There is also so much happening all the time, I feel like I am constantly busy because there are just so many opportunities on campus to get involved and meet new people.
What is one extra-curricular activity you participate in at UVA?
I tried not to sign up for too much the first semester while I am trying to acclimate to living on my own in a new place, but I joined the Red Cross club and might join the club running team in a few weeks. Clubs are relatively casual here, which is nice because there is not a huge time commitment, so I still have time to study.
What differentiates UVA from Convent of the Sacred Heart?
I think the biggest difference between UVA and Sacred Heart is the size. It is definitely really different walking to class and not knowing everyone on my way. I do miss seeing so many familiar faces around me all the time, but I have also met so many amazing new people as well.
How has Sacred Heart prepared you for college?
College is definitely a lot of work. With the exception of my French class, which meets every day for 50 minutes, most of my classes only meet twice a week. So I guess Sacred Heart prepared me for the time management aspect of college. There is not a lot of homework due for specific nights, just a reading schedule to follow every week. One really different aspect of college is that my professors do not spend any time telling me when my next test is, or paper is due, so it is really important to read the syllabus and write out a schedule with all of the assignment due dates at the beginning of the semester.

Pictured are Katie Nail '16 and Cynthia Thomas '16 wearing their college sweatshirts. Courtesy of Katie Nail '16
Katie Nail ’16 and Cynthia Thomas ’16 wear their college sweatshirts and celebrate their acceptances.
Courtesy of Katie Nail ’16

 
How did you get involved with your school community and other students?
It was really nice coming to UVA knowing a lot of people from the Fairfield County area. I had already started to meet up with and talk to other incoming first years over the summer, so I already felt pretty involved with other UVA students. I also am really excited to rush a sorority, which happens the second semester in January.
What do you believe is the biggest challenge of adjusting and moving into UVA?
I think the biggest challenge is probably just being on my own for the first time. I went from spending every day with my family and friends from home, to living on my own surrounded by a lot of people I do not know.
Alex Dimitri
Syracuse University Class of 2020
Managing Editor and Co-Video Content Editor of the King Street Chronicle
How would you describe your initial reaction to living at Syracuse University?
The atmosphere at Syracuse University is a combination of immense school spirit and academic dedication. As a community, we love to come together and “bleed orange” at every game, but we also have a serious commitment to our studies and extracurriculars.
What is one extra-curricular activity you participate in at Syracuse University?
At Syracuse, I am interested in continuing my passion for journalism by writing for our school newspaper, The Daily Orange. Additionally, I am also hoping to continue my love for volunteering by applying to be a Big Sister through Syracuse’s Big Brother Big Sister Program.
What differentiates Syracuse University from Sacred Heart?
The biggest difference between Convent of the Sacred Heart and Syracuse would definitely be the class sizes. My biggest class at Sacred Heart was Senior Seminar where we had the entire class of 76 students. At Syracuse, I have 180 person lectures almost every day with small discussion sessions every other day.
How has Sacred Heart prepared you for college?
Sacred Heart has prepared me for college by teaching me the importance of setting a schedule, asking questions in class and being confident with myself.
How did you get involved with your school community and other students?
I live in a dorm on a hill that all Syracuse students refer to as “The Mount.” This is because it is 200 steps uphill from campus and is located on the highest point on campus, on Mount Olympus Drive. On the Mount, there are two freshmen-only dorms, Flint and Day Hall. I am in Day Hall which has around 650 students whereas Flint Hall has around 400 students. Altogether, there are more than a thousand freshmen on the Mount.
Alex Dimitri '16 and other Syracuse University Class of 2020 students celebrate a sporting event. Courtesy of Alex Dimitri '16
Alex Dimitri ’16 and other Syracuse University Class of 2020 students celebrate a sporting event.
Courtesy of Alex Dimitri ’16

Because The Mount is freshmen-only, it is very easy to meet all of the other students in my classes. I have made so many friends on my floor and while walking up the stairs to the Mount and down the stairs to the main campus.
What do you believe is the biggest challenge of adjusting and moving into Syracuse University?
The biggest challenge I faced in moving into college was saying goodbye to my family, friends, and the Sacred Heart community. All three have played such a large role in my life during the past couple of years and I am very grateful for all of the experiences and memories I have shared with them.
 
Alana Galloway
University of Michigan Class of 2020
Article Content Editor of the King Street Chronicle
How would you describe your initial reaction to living at University of Michigan? 
The first word I would use to describe the University of Michigan would definitely be happy. Everyone here has a genuine love for the school. In my two weeks here, I have yet to experience a day where I haven’t seen someone decked out in maize and blue at a game, pulling out Michigan folders and binders in class, or simply showing their school pride by wearing a University t-shirt or sweatshirt. In addition to this, the students all seem genuine, and I am constantly impressed by the intelligence of the student body as a whole.
What is one extra-curricular activity you participate in at the University of Michigan?
I am currently in the middle of sorority rush, so I have not had time for much aside from rush and school. However, I definitely intend to join the Michigan Daily, the University of Michigan’s daily paper, staff as soon as possible!
What differentiates University of Michigan from Sacred Heart?
I think that the most daunting and challenging difference between the University of Michigan and Sacred Heart has been the change in size. While my class at Sacred Heart had a mere 75 girls, the Class of 2020 at Michigan consists of 6860 students! At over 300 students, my Abnormal Psychology class alone has more students than the entire high school at Sacred Heart.
How has Sacred Heart prepared you for college?
At Sacred Heart, I definitely learned the skills necessary to succeed in a college environment. I know how to manage my time strategically and how to converse with teachers and other students in a scholarly manner. Sacred Heart taught me how to write, think, and work intellectually, and these are skills I continue to utilize and practice on a daily basis.
How did you get involved with your school community and other students?
Alana Galloway '16 and other University of Michigan Class of 2020 student celebrate a football game. Courtesy of Alana Galloway '16
Alana Galloway ’16 and other University of Michigan Class of 2020 student celebrate a football game.
Courtesy of Alana Galloway ’16

I have always been a very friendly and social person, so I have a tendency to stop in the middle of the street for the sole purpose of saying hi and introducing myself to unfamiliar faces. Although this sometimes drives the people I am with insane, it has definitely helped me make more friends. Having been here for only two weeks, I can honestly say that there has never been a time that I have walked to class or to the dining hall without seeing friends and stopping to talk multiple times.
What do you believe is the biggest challenge of adjusting and moving into University of Michigan?
For me, the biggest challenge of adjusting and moving to Michigan has been managing my time. In college, your school becomes your home, and your classmates and friends become your family. It is an amazing experience, but it’s also difficult to know how to distinguish one thing from another. It is hard to focus on work when your best friends are inviting you out to dinner a short walk away, and it is difficult to study when you know there’s a party right down the road.
– Elisabeth Hall, News Editor and Photo Editor