From risk comes reward for Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai aspires to improve girls' education in her bestselling book, I Am Malala.
Photo courtesy of Time Magazine

Malala Yousafzai aspires to improve girls’ education in her bestselling book, I Am Malala. Photo courtesy of Time Magazine

Malala Yousafzai aspires to improve girls' education in her bestselling book, I Am Malala.  Photo courtesy of Time Magazine
Malala Yousafzai aspires to improve girls’ education in her bestselling book, I Am Malala.
Photo courtesy of Time Magazine

One year after being shot for defying the Taliban, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai has transformed into an activist for girls’ education.
Malala released her autobiography, I am Malala, October 5, 2013. In her book, she tells her story and explains where she gained the courage to combat unjust actions. She goes on to explain the importance of education, particularly for the 32 million girls around the world who are uneducated.
Shortly after the release of her book, Malala met with Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, to whom she presented her memoir. While in England, she proposed that the Queen work with her to ensure that every girl receives a proper education.
“Especially in this country as well, because I have heard about many children that cannot go to school,” Malala said according to CNN, “so I hope that we will continue our work on youth empowerment.” 

In addition, Malala met with United States President Barack Obama in celebration of the International Day of the Girl. She bravely and shamelessly criticized the President for initiating drone attacks on Pakistan.
“If we refocus efforts on education it will make a big impact,” Malala said according to CNN.

The European Parliament awarded Malala the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought October 10, 2013. She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, the youngest nominee in history.
Malala’s influence extends from Pakistan all the way to Convent of the Sacred Heart Greenwich. Sacred Heart sponsors its sister school in Uganda to ensure that the young Ugandan girls receive a proper education, fueling Malala’s dream.

“Malala reminds me that there are still people fighting for what they believe and that applies to all generations not only past ones,” sophomore Nebai Hernandez said. “She reminds me that I can make a difference and that I can take a proactive role in society instead of a passive one.”
Her ultimate goal is to guarantee that all girls receive the rights that she has earned for herself.
According to CNN, Malala said, “I have the right of education. I have the right to play. I have the right to sing. I have the right to talk.”
– Cheyann Greirson, Staff Writer
Sources:
http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/18/world/europe/uk-queen-malala-yousafzai/index.html?iref=allsearch